Should i get a new piano?

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Mariana Johnson asked a question: Should i get a new piano?
Asked By: Mariana Johnson
Date created: Wed, Jul 7, 2021 3:10 PM
Date updated: Sat, Jul 9, 2022 5:50 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Should i get a new piano»

Pros of Buying a New Piano

If you can afford to invest in quality—and you know how to care for your piano—buying a new piano can mean decades of stress-free play. It provides a stable instrument for new learners. Hardly anything could discourage a new pianist more than an out-of-pitch (annoying-to-play) instrument.

  • If you’re not absolutely sure you don’t want to learn, your kids/husband/wife/partner/roommate doesn’t want to learn, then keep your piano around. You might be glad you did. However, there may be better options than your 100 year old upright piano; either a new keyboard, or a new digital piano.

10 other answers

Novelty and performance are common reasons to buy new. If you can afford to invest in quality—and you know how to care for your piano —buying a new piano can mean decades of stress-free play. It provides a stable instrument for new learners. Hardly anything could discourage a new pianist more than an out-of-pitch (annoying-to-play) instrument.

Should I get a new piano/digital piano, should I upgrade. This is the Yamaha psr-6 and it sounds trash, it’s a 49-key keyboard, but some of the keys don’t work so it’s more like a 45. Anyways, just wondering if I should get something better at my skill level? (I’ve been playing for 7 months)

For big-ticket items like acoustic pianos, a warranty is crucial. Most brand new pianos have warranty of at least 5 years. Be careful when purchasing a piano from private retailers. Most piano brands, including Yamaha and Steinway, do NOT provide warranty coverage for pianos sold by unauthorised private retailers.

People stumble on their search for a piano when: 1) They haven’t decided if they really want to learn/play - If you ask most people if they would like to learn piano or like their progeny to learn piano, they will say, “yes, of course!”But most people leave it there. One of the most common things we see is people who sign their kids up for a month of lessons at the lowest price they can ...

Unless you like the piano sound in an old Western movie, you may need to either replace the felt, or buy a new piano. A lot of work is involved in changing every felt on every key, so this can be quite an expensive and time consuming exercise. Digital pianos on the other hand, never require tuning and the tone doesn’t deteriorate over time.

Considering what kind of piano to buy when you are starting to play the piano can be a tough decision. They are expensive and it seems like there are a milli...

But the hybrid piano isn’t always the number one choice. One reason is that it is a step costlier than the acoustic piano. Another debatable point is the sound quality. The hybrid piano, even with its action mechanism and authentic sounds, can sound different due to the implementation of all the digital components. But that’s for you to decide.

In some cases, repairs can be half as expensive as the piano itself, or in other cases, it is easier to get a new model instead. Getting parts can also be difficult, especially if your digital piano is more than 10 years old.

On the flip side, if the piano is brand new, freshly rebuilt, or restrung, you’ll need to get it tuned four times in the first year (or more if it’s played a lot). The reason for this is the new strings. New strings haven’t finished stretching out yet. As you play, the strings will loosen and go flat quite quickly.

If you want to play organ, electric piano, synth, etc, you might want unweighted keys and a smaller keyboard doesn't matter as much. Another question is why you want a smaller keyboard. If it's to save space or weight, go for it. If it's to save money... ugh.

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