What piano keys to tune a trumpet?

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Hailey Runolfsson asked a question: What piano keys to tune a trumpet?
Asked By: Hailey Runolfsson
Date created: Sat, Mar 20, 2021 3:02 PM
Date updated: Mon, Jul 25, 2022 2:11 PM

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Top best answers to the question «What piano keys to tune a trumpet»

Trumpets can tune to A (1st and 2nd valves pressed) while piano plays G. Trumpets can tune to G (open) while piano plays F. Pianos can play Bb to match the C (open) position on the trumpet. Trumpets can tune to D (1st and 3rd valves or just 1st valve) while piano plays C.

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Trumpets can tune to A (1st and 2nd valves pressed) while piano plays G Trumpets can tune to G (open) while piano plays F Pianos can play Bb to match the C (open) position on the trumpet Trumpets can tune to D (1st and 3rd valves or just 1st valve) while piano plays C

Making sure your trumpet's in tune is key to playing and practicing well. Luckily, tuning a trumpet is simple once you know the right technique. By adjusting its C note through the tuning slide, you can tune the trumpet to make sure it isn't too flat or too sharp. By tuning and maintaining your trumpet, you should be able to produce a clear sound.

For example, if you want the trumpet to match the note Bb on a piano or guitar, then you must write a C for the trumpet. The trumpeter reads what s/he thinks of as C, and the sound that comes out of the trumpet is what the rest of us think of as Bb.

When you tune to a fixed pitch instrument, it is best to play the note on the trumpet first for if the piano is played first, you will tend to lip your trumpet note up or down in order to match the piano note. Even before the trumpet’s tuning note is played, it is best to play a short scale up to that note in order to center your pitch. For a trumpet/cornet player this would be done this way ...

Most beginning Trumpet players are better off tuning to a Concert F which is a G on Trumpet. (If that statement seems weird, read this other page or at least the Concert Pitch part of it.) That G is easier for most players and more likely the result of fewer bad habits (like excessive pressure). Tuning requires the use of some reference pitch.

If you use an instrument to tune the trumpet, you need to play a concert Bb on it. On a piano, the note is Bb, but it will be different for other instruments. On the trumpet it is the middle C. Try to match the note on the trumpet to the note from the other instrument.

The trumpet is pitched in B flat and the piano is in C. That means that when you play a C in the piano, it sounds as a C, but when you play a C on the trumpet, it sounds a B flat. So if you want to play the two instruments together, you have to transpose the notes one whole step higher for the trumpet (i.e. C=D, D=E, E= F#, F = G and so on).

The best way to tune is to play an open note like a C or G. Use a tuner or other instrument to tune with and adjust the main tuning slide until your note is in tune. Extend the slide if you are sharp and shorten it if your note is flat. Keep your finger ready on the third valve slide and possibly the first valve slide.

On a piccolo trumpet, there is an additional valve for playing low notes. Essentially, when playing a scale, the fourth valve is used to play notes below the low F. The fourth valve is operated using the little finger of the right hand or the index finger of the left hand.

Tight Key Bushings: Piano keys rely on two different pins — a balance pin and a guiding pin— to ensure the key rocks on its fulcrum and stays appropriately aligned. The pins rest inside a felt-cushioned part of the pin. If these felt bushings are too tight, either because they are new or because moisture has made them swell, the pins will not move freely and the key will stick or move ...

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